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Minas Tirith Forums » Library Council of Minas Tirith » Why did the Towers of the Teeth fall down when the Ring was destroyed? (Page 2)
Author Topic: Why did the Towers of the Teeth fall down when the Ring was destroyed?
Dark Phoenix
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When his body was intact,his spirit was not linked to the tower directly;and when he lost his full strength and his body,the tower which was not linked to his fate, did not fall;however,when his eye was linked to the tower it shared his fate;but if he died during the second age the tower would have probably not have fallen,but seeing as that never happend we would never know.Now as i said before saurons eye was linked to the tower and the tower to the land,so when sauron died,so did all that was linked to him.
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Ulairë Gordis
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quote:
if he died during the second age the tower would have probably not have fallen,but seeing as that never happend we would never know
Actually Sauron "died" twice at the end of the Second Age.

Please, note that this thread is not discussing why Barad-Dur had fallen - it is clear enough, but why did the Towers of the Teeth at Morannon fall!

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Mithrennaith
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quote:
....., when his eye was linked to the tower it shared his fate; .....
Mr Peach ought to be advised to read the replies to his post more carefully: what he describes comes from Peter Jackson's Middle-earth, which regrettably has rather little to do with J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle-earth. It is the latter we are discussing here, not the former, which differs from it in many unexpected and inconsistent ways.

The eye between two horns of the Dark Tower is a figment of PJ's vivid imagination and has no existence whatsoever in Tolkien's writings.

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The Witch-King of Angmar
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I wouldn't call PJ's imagination "vivid," but rather limited.
Maybe Sauron had flaming red eyes, since it was stated in the Silmarillion that "the eye of Sauron few could endure;" however he was in near-human form-- except that he was very tall, and his skin was black and burning hot.

[ 07-04-2006, 10:01 PM: Message edited by: The Witch-King of Angmar ]

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Alcuin
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According to the maps provided with the books – there is a very large, fold-out map provided inside the back cover of some editions of the books – it was approximately 100 miles from Orodruin to the Morannon. I’m no geologist, but a cursory glance at all the maps shows that there is a large circular feature or “bowl” that makes the Valley of Udûn. There are openings at either end: the Morannon in the north, and the Isenmouthe in the south. These openings occur along a more-or-less straight line to Orodruin. The Ephel Dúath range runs along a north-south axis, while the Ered Lithui runs east-west. The implication, I think – and someone who’s a real geologist reading this thread might want to offer his own opinion – is that there is a fault line between the Ephel Dúath and the Ered Lithui lying along the bottom of the Valley of Udûn running from Morannon to Isenmouthe.

Earthquakes can travel quite far along fault lines. The distance the fault “unzips” – the length of the fracture – is related to the size of the quake. The 1906 San Francisco magnitude 7.8 earthquake, for instance, ruptured the San Andreas fault over at least 300 km (186 miles) and possibly as long as 430 km (267 miles). The August 17, 1999, magnitude 7.3 earthquake of the North Anatolian Fault Zone in Turkey ruptured about 150 km (93 miles) of the North Anatolian Fault. (http://www.koeri.boun.edu.tr/astronomy/pektas/pektas_agu.htm).

It would probably not be necessary to break the entire fault for the effects a large earthquake to be felt at quite some distance. To cite just a couple of examples:
• The swimming pool at the University of Arizona in Tucson lost water from sloshing (seiche) caused by the 1985 M8.1 Michoacan, Mexico earthquake 2000 km (1240 miles) away. (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learning/facts.php)
• Some very powerful earthquakes occurred along the New Madrid fault in the Mississippi Valley in 1811-1812. The effects of shaking from these magnitude 8+ earthquakes caused church bells to ring in Boston, Massachusetts, nearly 1600 km (1000 miles) away. (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learning/facts.php. I grew up in the region those earthquakes struck, and they knocked down chimneys on buildings in my home town 160 miles away. No fault line runs from New Madrid to the place I grew up; nor does any from New Madrid to Boston: it was simply the shaking of the continental rock. http://www.ceri.memphis.edu/compendium/)

Propagation of earthquakes (so-called “earthquake swarms”) is often associated with volcanic activity and sea-floor spreading. (http://kiska.giseis.alaska.edu/dbases/swarmcat/GVESD.HTML) These have been widely studied in recent years. More controversial is the idea of an “earthquake storm” (http://www.open2.net/journeysfrom/articlec.html¸ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remotely_triggered_earthquakes) such as the series of events that brought about the end of the Bronze Age around 1200 BC and a series of severe earthquakes in the eastern Mediterranean around 360-365 AD in the so-called “Universal Event” (http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/horizon/2003/earthquakestormstrans.shtml). Vy this reasoning, an earthquake at Orodruin could have triggered a second, even larger event in the Valley of Udûn.

Both the rampart constructed across the Morannon and the two Númenórean towers (the Towers of the Teeth) could easily have been subjected to shaking severe enough to bring them down depending upon the geology of the region, the foundations upon which they were constructed, and the type of shaking to which they were subjected.

Again, I’m not a geologist, and it would be interesting to get input from someone who is.

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The Witch-King of Angmar
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The earthquake resulted from the Ring's power ending-- most likely at Mount Doom. The earth itself wasn't constructed with the Ring's power, however just about everything else in Mordor was.
When the Great Signal went up, a simple flash went up from Mount Doom:

quote:
At that moment the rock quivered and trembled beneath them. The great rumbling noise, louder than ever before, rolled in the ground and echoed in the mountains. Then with searing suddenness there came a great red flash. Far beyond the eastern mountains it leapt into the sky and splashed the lowering clouds with crimson. In that valley of shadow and cold deathly light it seemed unbearably violent and fierce. Peaks of stone and ridges like notched knives sprang out in staring black against the uprushing flame in Gorgoroth. Then came a great crack of thunder.
Everything made with the power of the Ring, passed with its destruction; this is what caused the "quake."
However, a real earthquake is caused by shifting tectonic plates, vs. volcanic activity or some other massive impact-- so there wouldn't be any "fault lines" to take into account.

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Alcuin
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quote:

a real earthquake is caused by shifting tectonic plates, vs. volcanic activity or some other massive impact-- so there wouldn't be any "fault lines" to take into account.

I see.

So we should all just ignore that large eruption taking place at Orodruin, then? No aftereffects from the event, eh? “Nothing happening here, folks! Clear out! Go home!”

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The Witch-King of Angmar
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The eruption of Orodruin happened for the same reason as all the rest--the destruction of the Ring.

However this metion of "fault lines" is non sequitur regarding a volcanic eruption.

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