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Minas Tirith Forums » The Prancing Pony » Party Tree Recipes (Page 1)
Author Topic: Party Tree Recipes
Roll of Honor Celebrían
Guard of the Citadel
Citizen # 2057

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Would anyone like to share recipes that would comfort a peckish Hobbit?
I am expecting a few ethnic and Middle Earth-type recipes from some denizens of the White City.

To start the salivation process, tuck in a red elven handkerchief under your chin and think of:

MIDDLE EARTH RECIPES (not copyrighted, of course)
Bacon and Mushroom recipes
ETHNIC RECIPES FROM YOUR CORNER OF ARDA:
Favorite spices on certain foods
REGIONAL SPECIALTIES:
Lembas variations
Goldberry Breakfast Porridge
Farmer Maggot's glazed carrots
Party Tree occasions
~~~~~
Recipes from pages 1-6 in first post.

Gaffer's Sunday Dinner. Thingol of Doriath #2718

Filé of veal... though pork works just as well, and is more economical.

Cut the filé into 1½ inch(3cm) pieces and tenderize them... in other words, pound them flat.

Brown them in a skillet, a couple of minutes on each side... so they are cooked all the way through, though not well done.

Put them in an oven-form. On each filé, place a half canned pear and a chunk of blue cheese. Place in the oven.

It takes only about 10 minutes... until the cheese melts.
~~~~~

Sméagol's Salmon Dish. Thingol of Doriath #2718

In HoMe XXI, Tolkien explained that Sméagol actually enjoyed his fish cooked before he changed to Gollum... made by his grandmother, when she wasn't sucking on eggs.

Bake salmon filés in the oven... easy. I like to sprinkle a little salt flakes on the salmon, keeps them juicy.

Sauce: lots of cream with a few tablespoons of balsam vineagar, salt and peppar. Not for people counting calories...

When the sauce comes to a simmer, add fresh spinach. Baby spinach works fine... but it has to be fresh, none of that frozen c**p. Stir a few minutes until the spinach softens.

Serve.
~~~~~

Smaug's Gems. White Maiden #4389

Combine 1 cup of vanilla wafer crumbs, 1 cup of confectioners' sugar, 1 cup of chopped nuts and 1 tablespoon of cocoa. Add 2 tablespoons of light corn syrup and 1/4 cup of whisky Mix well and shape into 1-inch balls. Roll in confectioners' sugar and place in an air-tight container. Store in the refrigerator
~~~~~

Malva Headstrong's Summer Pickle Salad. Gna #3830

2 large cucumbers
2 ripe tomatos
1/2 medium red onion
1 or 2 crunchy dill pickle(s)
1/3 cup mixed vinegars (mostly white vinegar, but with red wine, balsamic, rice, and/or cider vinegars splashed in for variety)
1 Tbsp dried dill weed (more to taste, or use fresh)
Salt to taste

Remove peel and seeds from cucumbers; chop. Remove seeds from tomatos; chop. Chop red onion and dill pickles. Place chopped vegetables in large bowl (not metal; Tupperware is best) and pour vinegars over them. Add dill weed. Add more dill weed-go on, it's good for you. Add salt to taste, and mix well. Cover and refrigerate.

Goes well with any barbecued meats. Or, add a bit of crumbled feta cheese and make a lunchtime salad.
~~~~~

The Tirion Túna Treat. Wetwang #1508

1-Take some fresh tuna and cut it into one inch (2.5cm) cubes.
2-Open a coconut and pour the milk into a bowl.
3-Grate the coconut flesh into the same bowl as the milk.
4-Add the tuna, stir and leave for several hours in the fridge.
5-Remove from fridge, drain and dry tuna with kitchen roll.
6-Deep fry at a high temperature until the tuna is still just pink in the centre, about two or three minutes.

Serve on a bed of rice with a mild vegetable curry of your choice
~~~~~

Idyllic Ithilien Summer Salad. Aerel #2697

1) Dice fresh tomatoes and add finely sliced spring onions. Place in a bowl, season and add vinegrette, and leave to marinade while doing step 2 + 3.
2) Chop cooked potatoes into rough cubes and place in a saucepan. Add olive oil - just enough to lightly coat them and prevent them from sticking to the saucepan.
3) Warm the potatoes over a medium heat, stirring to prevent them going crispy - you want to warm them not fry them.
4) Add the warm potatoes to the tomatoes and spring onions. Toss and serve. You can vary the ingredients to your heart's delight, chopped bacon is lovely (if you're not veggie), red onions instead of spring onions, fresh rocket, basil or anything else you can find in your garden or fridge.
Perfect on a Summer's day in the garden of Ithilien with a good book or, failing that, good company.
~~~~~

Lembas Rivendell Enquantuva. Celebrían #2057

If you are suddenly visited on a weekend night by some hungry hobbits and dwarves, this recipe will hopefully "refill" those tummies.
From my uni penny-watching days:

Cut a long loaf of Italian or French bread into thick slices. Warm them briefly under the broiler. Turn them over and add a slice of Münster cheese to each piece of lembas, a tiny bit of salt and a shake of your favorite parsley or other dried green herb. Broil only until the cheese barely starts to melt.

Serve with iced tea or bubblies.
~~~~~

Chica Chubb's Arroz con Pollo (Rice with Chicken). Gna #3830

1-2 boneless, skinless chicken breast(s), cut into bite-sized pieces
1/2 large onion, diced
1 jalapeno pepper, de-seeded and minced
1 green (bell) pepper, de-seeded and diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 15-oz can diced, stewed tomatos with liquid
1 cup long-grain white rice, uncooked
Canola oil as needed

This recipe is easiest to prepare using a wok (ethnically inappropriate, but true nonetheless). First, stir-fry chicken pieces in a small amount of oil until cooked through; remove from wok and set aside. Next, stir fry onion, garlic, and peppers in a small amount of oil, for 2-3 minutes. Add uncooked rice and enough oil to keep rice from sticking (doesn't require more than about a tablespoon-we're not deep-frying here!). Stir-fry rice until grains turn golden-brown. Add diced tomatos and their liquid-you might want to add another half-cup of water, because the rice will cook in this liquid. Reduce heat to low, cover wok, and cook rice, tomatos, and other vegetables for 20-25 minutes, stirring occasionally, until liquid is absorbed and rice is cooked (don't overcook rice though). Add chicken pieces to heat through before serving; top each bowl with grated cheddar or Monterey Jack cheese, and add salt and pepper to taste.

A fresh fruit salad makes a nice accompaniment, and flour tortillas (with butter, if you want to be a fat Texan ) should be offered on the side. I like the Guerrerro brand flour tortillas that you heat on a griddle just before serving-most other brands taste like cardboard to me
~~~~~

Herbed Salmon. Thorin #816

I saw a very Middle-earthy way of cooking salmon fillets in Finland. We took a large fillet and nailed it to a birch board with birch pegs. We then sprinkled sea salt and lemon juice on it and propped it up perpendicular to a camp fire. Quite tasty! But I don't know how many lemons were in the north-west of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age.
~~~~~

Turkey Chedder Chili. Snöwdog #15

1 Tablespoon Olive Oil
3 cloves garlic, chopped
1 white or yellow onion, chopped
2-3 serreno chillies, seeded and chopped
1½ lb. lean ground turkey
½ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cummin
1 teaspoon ancho chili powder (or Raven's)
16 Oz. diced tomatoes (fresh) or one can storebought
3 cups (2 15 Oz. cans) pinto beans, drained and rinsed
1 cup grated extra-sharp chedder cheese
1 cup hot salsa
Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium/high heat.
Add garlic, onions, & chilies & cook, stirring several times until onion is soft (usually 4-5 minutes).
Add turkey, ¼ teaspoon salt, ½ teaspoon cummin, ½ teaspoon chili powder.

Stir and break up the turkey and reduce heat to medium. Cook, stirring frequently until turkey is done (usually 8-10 minutes).
Add tomatoes and beans and cook for another 6-8 minutes.
Season to taste.
Serve immediatly, garnish with cheese and salsa.
~~~~~

Lembas. Arorë Silvertongue #3570

6Tbsp. honey
6Tbsp. butter, soft but not melted
4 Cups unbleached flour
2 eggs
1 Cup milk
4 Tbsp. heavy cream
2-4 Tbsp. granulated sugar (depending on your sweet tooth)

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
In large bowl mix honey, butter and four together with a fork or pastry masher until the mixture reaches the consistancy of cornmeal. Add sugar. Mix. In a smaller bowl mix milk and eggs. Mix egg+milk mixture and cream into the flour mixture. Mix just until it becomes a stiff, sticky dough. Knead three or four times on a lightly foured surface. Roll out to a 1/2 inch thickness. Cut into round or oval shapes and place on very lightly greased cookie sheet.
Bake for 12-15 minutes or until the bottoms(hard to tell, I know) are just lightly golden brown.
Do NOT eat until cool.

If you don't store these in an air tight contaner they will last for a while though they will get hard.
~~~~~

Bacon & Chedder Clams. Snöwdog #15

Beachcomb for some nice Ocean Clams. The cove midway between the outwash of the two rivers is the most popular clam beds.
Prepare the clams.
Get some good lean center cut Bacon, any good butcher will be able to supply some nice cuts.
Get a brick of sharp cheddar cheese, White Mountain Vale from Rohan is the best.

Now for the fun....

Wrap a clam with about a 1/3 strip bacon & secure it with a pinelog splinter (toothpick)
Place them in a shallow baking dish.
Bake or broil until bacon is nearly cooked.
Place a cube of cheese on top and continue cooking until cheese melts.

Enjoy!

A variation is to drop the bacon-wrapped clam in hot fat and deep fry them, and add shredded cheese to the fresh-cooked clam wraps.
~~~~~

Recipe for Roast Hare. Alothmin i Nolmo #3706
Take a skinned, cleaned hare. Boil it lightly with water and salt in a heavy boiling-pot [heavy boiling pot not mentioned in published Arabic text]; drain off the water and thread it on a skewer and turn it over a moderate charcoal fire; then grease it with fresh butter once and when the meat is done, remove from its joints and cut it up in a serving dish. Pour on it a sauce of vinegar and a little murri naqî', ginger, thyme, cumin, oil and a little pounded garlic; boil all this and pour it on it. Greasing it with fresh butter at the time of roasting is to moderated the dryness of its nature. If coated with oil of sweet almonds it is very good.
~~~~~

Special Breakfast Toast. Silaldien #4787

1 slice of bread
1 egg
2 slices of cheese (any kind your little heart desires)

Cut the egg up. Put it on the bread. Put cheese on top of that. Put in toaster oven. Set for light toast (or just heat until cheese melts)
~~~~~

Falas Rhûn Crabcakes. Celebrían #2057

1 slice of white bread, crust removed (the less bread the better)
1-2 tablespoons mayonnaise
1 teaspoon OLD BAY Seasoning (contains enough salt)
1 egg, beaten
1 pound/450g crab meat, clear of shell

Crumble the bread, add everything but the meat and mix.
Add the meat and shape into patties gently.
Fry or broil about 5 minutes per side.
~~~~~

Burgundy Skirt Steaks. Snöwdog #15

1 Cup Burgundy Wine
2 Tablespoons Champagne wine vinegar
¼ teaspoon dried rosemary leaves (crushed)
¼ teaspoon dried sage, (crushed)
¼ teaspoon coriander seeds (crushed)
¼ teaspoon dried thyme leaves (crushed)
5 black peppercorns (crushed)
2 whole cloves
4 skirt steaks, placed with wooden skewers
salt & pepper (optional, to taste)
½ small onion, thinly sliced
¼ carrot, thinly sliced
2 cloves of garlic, peeled and crushed
3 sprigs of parsley
1 tablespoons Olive oil
½ teaspoon cornstarch
1 teaspoon cold water
1 Tablespoon apple jelly
1 Tablespoon cognac or brandy
1. In a small saucepan, mix the wine, vimegar, rosemary, sage, coriander, thyme, peppercorns, and cloves.
Bring to a boil and remove from heat.
Set this aside to cool.

2. Sprinkle steaks on both sides with salt and pepper and rub into meat. Put them into a dish where they fit easily.
Add onion, carrot, garlic, & parsley.
Pour wine mixture (what you heated earlier) over steak and
vegtables.
Cover and refrigerate overnight.

3. (Next day) Remove steak from marnide and set it aside.
Strain the maranide through a sieve and toss out the captured solids.
Boil the remaining maranide until it is reduced by about half, then set aside.

4. Heat olive oil ina large heavy skillet until its very hot, and I mean hot!
Add steaks and cook until tey are nicely brown.
Turn and brown the other side. This process usuallt takes about 5-7 minutes depending on your stove's idiosyncrocys and the thickness of the steaks.
When cooked to your preference (meduim, medium-rare, etc.) remove to a platter and keep warm.
Pour the oil out of the skillet.

5. Blend cornstarch & water; when smooth whisk into the reduced sauce.
Add jelly and cognac or brandy.
Pour sauce into hot skillet and simmer until thickened, stirring to incorporate previous browings left in skillet.
Place the steaks on warm plates and pour sauce over them.
This is for four servings.
~~~~~

Garlic Mash. Sauron's Secret Agent #1891

- Boil 2lbs potatoes until tender, but not soft.
- Drain, return to pan, cover with a clean cloth and stand over a low heat for a few minutes to absorb the moisture.
- Add 7 oz 'soft garlic and herb cheese' and 4 tabs milk to the potatoes. Season to taste. Then mash until the mixture is smooth.

- If you are feeling really self-indulgent, add 2 oz butter before mashing.
- Gently reheat.
~~~~~

Pippin's Steak Parcel. Sauron's Secret Agent #1891

Enough steak for two people
2 oz butter
2 cloves garlic, crushed
4 oz mushrooms, sliced
1 packet dry soup mix (onion or mushroom)
2 glasses red wine
salt and pepper

Method:

- Lay sheet of double thickness foil on baking tray. Spread butter on, and sprinkle with the garlic.
- Sprinkle with half the soup mix and put steak on top.
- Cover with rest of soup mix, and season.
- Arrange mushrooms around meat and pour wine over.
- Fold foil to make a parcel.
- Bake in oven for one and a half hours at 180 degrees C, 360 F.

This is ideal to leave to cook on automatic while you go out. It makes the most wonderful sort of steak casserole in a package. Serve with non-killer mash and green veggies. Serves 2.
~~~~~

Celebrían's Celebration Syllabub. Sauron's Secret Agent #1891

1 lemon (preferably) or 4 tabs lemon juice
1/4 pint sweet sherry
2 tabs brandy
2 oz sugar
1/2 pint double cream (I think that's what you guys call heavy cream)
fresh lemon slices, or crystallized lemon slices

Finely grate rind of well-washed lemon. Squeeze juice. Place in bowl with sugar and sherry and brandy. Stir until sugar gives up the unequal struggle and dissolves.
Pour in the cream, and whisk until mixture will form soft peaks.
Spoon into 4 dishes. Chill.
Decorate with lemon slices, and serve.

This can be made the day before as it keeps well in the fridge.
~~~~~

Easterlings Chicken Salad. Sauron's Secret Agent #1891

Actually it sounds a bit tame for them, but still.

2 red onions, finely sliced
3-4 teaspoons curry powder
2 teaspoons olive oil
12 oz cooked chicken, diced
4 oz dried apricots
2 oz sultanas
3 tablespoons very good mayonnaise
3 tablespoons plain yogurt

1. Heat the olive oil, and fry the onions and curry powder, gently, until the onions are soft.
2. In a large bowl, combine the cooked onions, dried fruit, mayonnaise and yogurt. Stir well.
3. Add the chicken and mix until well coated. Refrigerate for several hours, or overnight, to allow the flavors to combine.
4. Serve with either a green or a mixed salad.
~~~~~

Fatty Lumpkins Pumpkin Pie. Wetwang #1508

This is a savoury pie that goes really well with either roast vegetables or bubble and squeak.

1- Use equal measures of pumpkin flesh and small, boiled cubes of potato.
2- Mix them together with some sweated, small diced onions. I usually use half a large onion to about 2lb of pumpkin/spud mix.
3- Add to this some crumbled Blue Stilton cheese. If you don't like blue cheeses then a good Cheddar works well.
4- Salt and fresh black pepper to taste and thats the filling

Chefs Tip
I usually mix all these ingredients while the spud and pumpkin are still warm. I've found it helps blend the flavours nicely.

5- Let the mix go cold before filling a pie dish that has been lined with wholemeal pastry, (homemade of course ). Make sure you pack the mix well into the casing. Afterall, the more filling the better the taste
6- Add a wholemeal top and brush with beaten egg.
7- Bake in a preheated oven at somewhere around 200 degrees C/400f for about 40 minutesish. And there you have it
~~~~~

Ginger Applecake. Sauron's Secret Agent #1891

6 oz self raising flour
1 teaspoon ground giner
1 teaspoon baking powder
3 oz soft brown sugar
1 egg, lightly beaten
6-8 tablespoons milk
1 oz unsalted butter, melted and cooled

Topping:
1 lb cooking apples (though it's even nicer with Coxes)
juice of 1 lemon
3 oz demerara sugar
1 teaspoon ground ginger
2 oz unsalted butter, melted and cooled

1. Grease a shallow 12 x 8 inch tin.
2. Sift the flour, ginger, and baking powder into a bowl. Stir in the soft brown sugar. Add the egg, 6 tablespoons of milk, and melted butter. Beat to a soft dropping consistency. (If it is too stiff, add more of the milk.)
3. Peel, core and slice the apples into thin wedges. Put in a bowl with the lemon juice, demerara sugar and ginger. Mix together gently.
4. Spoon the cake mixture into the tin and level the surface. Arrange the apple slices over the top. Pour over any liquid remaining in the bowl, then drizzle the melted butter over.
5. Bake in a preheated oven (200 C, 400 F) for 35 minutes, until the apples are golden brown on top. Remove from oven and cool.
~~~~~

Grandma’s Never-Fail Gingerbread. Sauron's Secret Agent #1891

(This is a fairly light gingerbread, not like parkin and its relations, but I never met anybody who didn't like it. It's best if you leave it a couple of days - in a tin, or wrapped in foil - before eating.)

4oz butter
4oz sugar
8oz self-raising flour
2 heaped tablespoons golden syrup or treacle
2 eggs
1¼ teaspoons mixed spice
½ teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda, dissolved in
½ cup boiling water

Cream butter and sugar together.
Add beaten egg, flour, ginger, spice. Stir well.
Add syrup/treacle and bicarb. in water.
Mix together thoroughly.

Bake in well-greased tin at Gas Mark 3 (feel free to translate ) for 45 minutes.

If you prefer the dark sticky variety, try this:

Dark Gingerbread

8oz plain flour
2 teaspoons ground ginger
1 teaspoon mixed spice
1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
2oz soft brown sugar
4oz margarine
6oz black treacle
2oz golden syrup
¼ pint milk
2 eggs, beaten

Sieve together flour, ginger, spice and bicarb. Stir in sugar.
Melt margarine, treacle and syrup gently.
Gradually beat in milk. Allow to cool. Add beaten eggs.
Stir liquids into dry mix.
Pour into greased 7 inch square deep cake tin.
Bake at 150 C, 300 F, Gas mark 2, for about 1 ¼ hours.

And diet-death:

Gingerbread Trifle

1/2 quantity Dark Gingerbread
jam (variety to taste)
2lb cooking apples (or yummy eaters like Cox)
ground ginger (to taste, try 1 teasp)
3oz sugar
1/2 pint creamy custard
cream

Split gingerbread and spread with jam. Place in serving dish.
Stew apples with ginger and sugar.
Pour over gingerbread (while apples hot), and leave to soak for one hour, at least. (I leave it overnight in the fridge.)
Top with custard.
Decorate with whipped cream.
Eat.
Die, and go straight to heaven.
~~~~~

Twice-Baked Potatoes with Salsa. Snöwdog #15

Samwise surely baked a few in his culinary days. One he brought home from the south was this hot number...

2 large baking potatoes (8 ounces each)
1/4 cup low-fat (1%) cottage cheese
1/4 cup low-fat (1.5%) buttermilk
2 tablespoons reduced-fat cream cheese (Neufchatel)
2 scallions, minced
1 tablespoon minced fresh jalapeño pepper
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
3/4 pound tomatoes, diced
1 small red bell pepper, diced
1/3 cup minced red onion
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1. Preheat oven to 450°F. Prick potatoes in several places. Bake for 45 minutes, or until tender. When cool enough to handle, halve potatoes lengthwise. With fork, fluff potato flesh inside and transfer to a bowl, leaving enough potato attached to skin to form a sturdy shell, about 1/8-inch thick.

2. Add cottage cheese, buttermilk, cream cheese, scallions, 1-1/2 teaspoons of jalapeño pepper, and the black pepper. Mix well to combine, then spoon into potato shells. Return to oven and bake until stuffing is piping hot, about 20 minutes.

3. Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, mix together tomatoes, bell pepper, red onion, cilantro, vinegar, sugar, salt, and remaining 1-1/2 teaspoons jalapeño. Spoon salsa over potatoes and serve.
~~~~~

Turkey, Marinade and Dressing. Snöwdog #15

Turkey Marinade
2 cloves garlic, cut up
1/2 tsp. pepper
1/2 tsp. oregano
1/2 tsp. seasoned salt
1 lemon (juice of)
1 Tbsp. salt
1/2 c. olive oil
Combine all ingredients and rub over the entire defrosted turkey night before.
Cover turkey; refrigerate and next day, cook.

Turkey and Dressing
1 turkey
1 large pan cooked cornbread
2 cups fine white bread crumbs
2 cups diced celery
3 cups diced onion
olive oil
6 raw eggs
3 cans cream of chicken soup
2 cans cream of mushroom soup
6 boiled eggs
1 can cream of celery soup
1 tbs. garlic powder
1 tbs. Greek seasoning (or your favorite)
1½ tbs. brown sugar
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. black pepper
1 can chicken broth

Turkey Preparation:
Thaw turkey, remove giblets, & wash well.
Line large pan with foil.
Salt and pepper inside of turkey.
Grease outside of turkey with maranide (see previous recipe).
Sprinkle outside of turkey with salt, pepper & garlic powder.
Wrap tightly in foil. Bake in preheated 375? oven for about 3 to 4 hours.
Baste every 45 minutes.

Dressing Preparation:

Cook a large pan of cornbread.
Chop celery & onions & sautee in a small amount of Olive oil until tender. You can decrease the amount of celery & onions according to your taste.
Boil 6 eggs, cool, peel & chop.
Crumble the cooked cornbread in an extra large pan. Add sauteed vegetables, raw eggs, chopped boiled eggs, white bread crumbs, soups, garlic powder, Greek seasoning, salt, pepper, & sugar. If you
like sage, add some. Add broth to make the dressing to desired
consistency. I like mine a little thicker than cornbread batter
mixture. Pour into a 4 or 5 in. deep baking pan & bake in preheated
350? oven until dressing is firm & lightly browned (approximately 1
hour). Baking the dressing in a deeper pan keeps the dressing from
becoming too dry while baking.
~~~~~

Barbecue Grilled Turkey. Imbëar #729

1. To cook the turkey, you will need a large foil pan which will protect the turkey from the hot coals.

2. Begin by stuffing the turkey with rosemary (preferably cut fresh from your own hedge), as well as whole cloves of garlic and the onion of your choosing. We prefer small, not overly strong onions - such as one might stuff a cornish game hen or quail with.
***NOTE: Do not "stuff" the turkey with stuffing!
The turkey will not cook properly!!!***

3. Next, brush the entire turkey with a good lather of olive oil. Now, rub the turkey down with pepper and large, course sea salt. At this stage in the operation, push a few grains of salt into the skin itself. Also, insert some pieces of garlic under the skin of the turkey, randomly or by pattern.

4. The final step to achieving superior moisture is to wrap the whole turkey with slices of bacon. The bacon needn't cover the turkey entirely, so don't overlap any of the slices. A single layer will do. The bacon will help hold the salt and garlic in during the initial stages of cooking.

5. Now, wrap the turkey in foil before placing inside the cooking pan. The cooking pan will sit inside of the barbecue. Push the sides of the cooking pan inward, so that extra coals can be heaped along the outside of the pan.

Allow the turkey to cook for three to four hours, or until the "bird" hits the right temperature (around 160 degrees F.).

6. During the final hour of cooking, you may slightly tear the inner foil wrapping so that the turkey develops a slightly dryer, brown crust. I will leave this up to you.
~~~~~

Cranberry and Orange Sauce. Wetwang #1508

Grate the rind off one orange and squeese the juice out of the flesh. Add to a saucepan and heat gently.
Next add a couple af tablespoons of cranberry jelly, the one that still has the whole cranberries in it. Heat until all mixed together. If it's too tart for you add some sugar or honey.
Pour over nut roast.
~~~~~

Whipped Brandy Butter

4 oz unsalted butter, very soft
2 tablespoons brandy
6 oz icing sugar (confectioners sugar? the powdery kind anyway)
1 tablespoon boiling water

Whip all ingredients together until mixure comes up almost white and has the texture of whipped cream. (This can take a while...)

That's it.

It will freeze for up to nine months; allow 2 hours for thawing.

If you omit the brandy, you have a light butter cream for filling cakes.
~~~~~

Potted Cheese. Sauron's Secret Agent #1891

8 oz mature Cheddar cheese, grated
4 oz unsalted butter, softened
2 level teaspoons coriander seeds, crushed
1/2 level teaspoon cumin seeds, crushed
Freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon whisky

Beat all the ingredients together until soft and fluffy, or whizz them in a food processor for a minute or so.

Spoon into small pots, and cover with clingfilm. Refrigerate.

Serve with crackers, or on fingers of toast, or use as a spread for sandwiches. (Goes wonderfully with watercress, on granary bread.)
~~~~~

Cranberry and Orange Sauce. Wetwang #1508
Grate the rind off one orange and squeese the juice out of the flesh. Add to a saucepan and heat gently.
Next add a couple af tablespoons of cranberry jelly, the one that still has the whole cranberries in it. Heat until all mixed together. If it's too tart for you add some sugar or honey.
Pour over nut roast.
~~~~~
Corned Beef Hash with Yukon Gold Potatoes. Snöwdog #15
2 pounds uncooked corned beef
2 pounds uncooked corned beef
1/2 pound Yukon Gold potatoes or other smooth-skinned potatoes

5 tablespoons unsalted butter
2/3 cup diced onions
1 Poblano chile, seeded and minced
1 Carrot, diced
2 tablespoons bottled chili sauce (such as Heinz) plus
1 teaspoon chili sauce (bottled or home-made)
Kosher Salt
8 large Eggs
Hot Sauce
Place the corned beef (and any spices that were in the bag) in a large pot and cover with water. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until very tender, about three hours, adding more water as needed to keep the meat covered. Remove the corned beef from the pot and allow to cool. Remove and discard the fat from the corned beef and shred the meat by pulling it apart with your fingers.
Roughly chop the shredded meat and set it aside.

Peel the potatoes, then cut into 1/2-inch dice. Place the potatoes in a pot of cold salted water and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook just until the potatoes are tender, about 15 minutes total cooking time. Drain the potatoes and set aside.

Preheat the oven to 200-F. Melt three Tablespoons of the butter in a 12-inch saute pan over high heat. Add the potatoes, onion, Poblano, and carrot. Fry, stirring occasionally until the potatoes begin to brown and the vegetables are soft. Add the corned beef and stir in the chili sauce. Season to taste with salt. Add the remaining two tablespoons butter to the pan and continue to cook over high heat, tossing, or turning the hash with a spatula, until it starts to get crisp and brown. Set the pan in the oven to keep the hash warm while you prepare the eggs any way you like them: poached, scrambled, over easy, or sunny side up.

On the plate: Divide the hash among 4 plates and top each with two cooked eggs. If desired, serve with hot sauce.
~~~~~~

Pickled Eggs a la Orodruin. Wetwang #

Hard boil enough eggs to pack tightly into the pickling jar of your choice.
Peel and put the eggs into the jar whilst they are still warm. It's really important to make sure your pickling jar is as clean as possible. I fill mine with boiling water until I'm ready to fill it
Then I put in plenty of pickling spices. Over here you can get pickling spice mixtures pretty easily. I use whole seed spices like black pepper corns, cumin, mustard seeds, cardomon, cloves, cinnamon and ginger.
Add chopped dry chilies, seeds and all, as many as you think you can handle + a few more I also add a few whole dry chayenne chilies to make the jar look nice.
Over all of this I pour dark pickling vinegar. I don't use the white stuff.
Leave to stand for at least four months. They get stronger with age and I once had some that were a year old.
They go really nice with fresh crusty white bread with a bit of the vinegar out of the jar poured on it.
~~~~~

White Trash. Arisimi

HARDWARE:

Double boiler
aluminium "turkey" pan (large alum. pan that you can throw out)
1 box Rice Chex cereal
1 cup creamy peanut butter
12 oz. peanut butter morstles (which only come in a 10 oz. package )
1 stick of butter (NOT margerine!)
1 pacakge of powered sugar
1 can non-stick cooking spray
1 CLEAN trash bag
1 VERY WILLING assistant
*may want to have a sifter handy for AFTER "Trash" is done*

DIRECTIONS:
Wash "turkey" pan, dry throughly and spray with non stick cooking spray.
Put cereal into pan and set aside.
Put powered sugar into trash bag and set aside.
In double boiler put peanut butter, morstles and stick of butter, stir until melted. *CAREFUL-It is easy to burn so you must watch it carfully. Burned peanut butter is THE nastiest thing ever! *
After mixture is melted, have assistant ready w/ a sturdy spoon. Pour mixture over cereal while assistant stirs to cover all cereal.
After mixture has covered cereal pour into trash bag.
**TAKE OUTSIDE** and shake to mix (this also GREAT to help relieve stress!)
**I sift mine because I don't like an extra pound of powered sugar, but you don't have to.
ENJOY!
(I usually have to make 2 or 3 "runs" for people, so I just re-use my alum. pan because you pick up some GREAT peanut butter flavours after that first batch. Just don't re-spray with the non-stick cooking spray after the first time!
~~~~~

[ 09-17-2006, 03:54 PM: Message edited by: Celebrían ]

From: First Homely House, Rivendell, Eriador | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Roll of Honor Snowman of Forochel
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I can't eat red beans and rice, jambalaya, crawfish etouffee, gumbo, etc. without tabasco sauce(crushed cayenne pepper, vinegar and salt aged in oak barrels for 2 years)

Those foods just aren't the same without it.

Nice thread. I'll have to add some recipes at a later date. []

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Eledhsúle
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Why, I'm getting hungry by just reading those.

I'll post few of my recepies as soon as I can find them... []

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Thingol of Doriath
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Ok... bear with me, and vegetarians look the other way. This recipe sounds a little strange but it is really good. I first had it in a restaurant in the Canary Islands. I got on friendly terms with the cook and fanagled the recipe from him. Though it is quite simple! [] I can almost make it as good as they did at the restaurant... whenever I have friends over for dinner they beg me to make this.

Gaffer's Sunday Dinner

Filé of veal... though pork works just as well, and is more economical.

Cut the filé into 1½ inch(3cm) pieces and tenderize them... in other words, pound them flat. []

Brown them in a skillet, a couple of minutes on each side... so they are cooked all the way through, though not well done.

Put them in an oven-form. On each filé, place a half canned pear and a chunk of blue cheese. Place in the oven.

It takes only about 10 minutes... until the cheese melts.

I know it sounds really wierd: meat, pear, cheese. [] But it is a taste sensation, trust me! [] []

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Thingol of Doriath
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While I'm at it... another favorite and simple recipe:

Sméagol's Salmon Dish

In HoMe XXI, Tolkien explained that Sméagol actually enjoyed his fish cooked before he changed to Gollum... made by his grandmother, when she wasn't sucking on eggs.

Bake salmon filés in the oven... easy. [] I like to sprinkle a little salt flakes on the salmon, keeps them juicy.

Sauce: lots of cream with a few tablespoons of balsam vineagar, salt and peppar. Not for people counting calories... []

When the sauce comes to a simmer, add fresh spinach. Baby spinach works fine... but it has to be fresh, none of that frozen c**p. Stir a few minutes until the spinach softens.

Serve. []

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White Maiden
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Smaug's Gems []

Combine 1 cup of vanilla wafer crumbs, 1 cup of confectioners' sugar, 1 cup of chopped nuts and 1 tablespoon of cocoa. Add 2 tablespoons of light corn syrup and 1/4 cup of whisky [] Mix well and shape into 1-inch balls. Roll in confectioners' sugar and place in an air-tight container. Store in the refrigerator.

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Roll of Honor Celebrían
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Wetwang's Sweet Potatoes

TheGentleman's Lembas Recipes

Gandalf the Grey's Mushrooms and Bacon, or There and Never Again

Snowdog's Serving suggestions with different types of beers

Thorongil's Hobbit Trivia food list

[ 06-08-2004, 03:20 PM: Message edited by: Celebrían ]

From: First Homely House, Rivendell, Eriador | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Roll of Honor Celebrían
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Singollo, I like your uncomplicated recipes for entertaining- you can concentrate attention on your guests.

White Maiden, your recipe sounds like the one everyone tries to feed the young lady hobbits at Christmas office parties.

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Malva Headstrong's Summer Pickle Salad

2 large cucumbers
2 ripe tomatos
1/2 medium red onion
1 or 2 crunchy dill pickle(s)
1/3 cup mixed vinegars (mostly white vinegar, but with red wine, balsamic, rice, and/or cider vinegars splashed in for variety)
1 Tbsp dried dill weed (more to taste, or use fresh)
Salt to taste

Remove peel and seeds from cucumbers; chop. Remove seeds from tomatos; chop. Chop red onion and dill pickles. Place chopped vegetables in large bowl (not metal; Tupperware is best) and pour vinegars over them. Add dill weed. Add more dill weed-go on, it's good for you. Add salt to taste, and mix well. Cover and refrigerate.

Goes well with any barbecued meats. Or, add a bit of crumbled feta cheese and make a lunchtime salad.

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Wetwang
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The Tirion Túna Treat

1-Take some fresh tuna and cut it into one inch (2.5cm) cubes.
2-Open a coconut and pour the milk into a bowl.
3-Grate the coconut flesh into the same bowl as the milk.
4-Add the tuna, stir and leave for several hours in the fridge.
5-Remove from fridge, drain and dry tuna with kitchen roll.
6-Deep fry at a high temperature until the tuna is still just pink in the centre, about two or three minutes.

Serve on a bed of rice with a mild vegetable curry of your choice []

-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-
Keep the earth under your feet, & clay on your fingers; wisdom in your bones, & have both eyes open!
That's Mr Wang™ to you!
This place would be a paradise tomorrow if every department had a supervisor with a submachine gun.

This bog is thick and easy...

From: West Sussex UK, well on the seafront in Bognor Regis actually! | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Thingol of Doriath
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A question Wet One... can one use canned coconut milk and coconut gratings(from a bag)? Or does one actually have to go through the trouble of sawing open a coconut?

Sounds delicious... []

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Wetwang
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You hit a real one with a bloody hammer you dinny Swede! []

-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-
Keep the earth under your feet, & clay on your fingers; wisdom in your bones, & have both eyes open!
That's Mr Wang™ to you!
This place would be a paradise tomorrow if every department had a supervisor with a submachine gun.

This bog is thick and easy...

From: West Sussex UK, well on the seafront in Bognor Regis actually! | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Thingol of Doriath
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I'm aware of that... I was born and raised in Hawaii, you dinny Brit! Saw or hammer... it still makes a heck of a mess.

You still haven't answered my question... []

[ 06-09-2004, 06:57 AM: Message edited by: Singollo of Doriath ]

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Wetwang
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I bet in your case you just head butted the thing to open it []
I've never used tinned cocnut milk or the packet grated stuff []
Fresh is best in my books []

-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-
Keep the earth under your feet, & clay on your fingers; wisdom in your bones, & have both eyes open!
That's Mr Wang™ to you!
This place would be a paradise tomorrow if every department had a supervisor with a submachine gun.

This bog is thick and easy...

From: West Sussex UK, well on the seafront in Bognor Regis actually! | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Roll of Honor Celebrían
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Coconut comment: I suggest finding two of the three black spots at the top of the coconut first. Tap in with a hammer, using a large nail to puncture. Remove the nail and drain the coconut milk. Then breaking open the nut with a borrowed dwarven axe is not so messy.

[ 06-09-2004, 10:43 AM: Message edited by: Celebrían ]

From: First Homely House, Rivendell, Eriador | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Eledhsúle
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* sniggers at Wetty and Singy *

All the recepies look really good. I'm very mcuh going to try Singy's stake with pear in it.

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Aerel
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A nice recipe to use up left-over potatoes, which I incidentally had for lunch today.
Idyllic Ithilien Summer Salad:
1) Dice fresh tomatoes and add finely sliced spring onions. Place in a bowl, season and add vinegrette, and leave to marinade while doing step 2 + 3.
2) Chop cooked potatoes into rough cubes and place in a saucepan. Add olive oil - just enough to lightly coat them and prevent them from sticking to the saucepan.
3) Warm the potatoes over a medium heat, stirring to prevent them going crispy - you want to warm them not fry them.
4) Add the warm potatoes to the tomatoes and spring onions. Toss and serve. You can vary the ingredients to your heart's delight, chopped bacon is lovely (if you're not veggie), red onions instead of spring onions, fresh rocket, basil or anything else you can find in your garden or fridge.
Perfect on a Summer's day in the garden of Ithilien with a good book or, failing that, good company.

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quote:
Remove peel and seeds from cucumbers; chop. Remove seeds from tomatos
You lost me right there. Admittedly, I'm an idiot when it comes to food prep, but how do you remove tomato seeds ?
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Wetwang
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[] []
You cut them in half or quarters and scoop out the watery bit, seeds and all WT.

-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-
Keep the earth under your feet, & clay on your fingers; wisdom in your bones, & have both eyes open!
That's Mr Wang™ to you!
This place would be a paradise tomorrow if every department had a supervisor with a submachine gun.

This bog is thick and easy...

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Roll of Honor Wandering Tuor
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Oh.
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Glóin the Dark
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Here's a guy that can do it while having split the tomato into no more than two components:

 -  -  -  -

I haven't yet discovered a technique for removing the seeds without distorting the topology of the rest of the tomato at all, but I'll keep looking.

I know it can be done with grapes, because I've eaten such paradoxical-seeming peculiarities.

[ 06-09-2004, 11:07 AM: Message edited by: Glóin the Dark ]

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Roll of Honor Celebrían
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Looking for an orange lembas recipe from Eledhsúle, a pongal recipe from Lugbúrz, a Swedish meatball recipe from the North...

Gna, I might replace dill with fresh cilantro in your salad- very nice!

From: First Homely House, Rivendell, Eriador | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Roll of Honor Celebrían
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Lembas Rivendell Enquantuva

If you are suddenly visited on a weekend night by some hungry hobbits and dwarves, this recipe will hopefully "refill" those tummies.
From my uni penny-watching days:

Cut a long loaf of Italian or French bread into thick slices. Warm them briefly under the broiler. Turn them over and add a slice of Münster cheese to each piece of lembas, a tiny bit of salt and a shake of your favorite parsley or other dried green herb. Broil only until the cheese barely starts to melt.

Serve with iced tea or bubblies.


P. S. I've field-tested the Túna, Gaffer's Sunday Dinner, and Malva and Ithilien salad recipes - they are excellent!

Singollo, how long do you allow for baking the salmon? Do you go by weight or by thickness of the fish?

[ 06-15-2004, 07:17 AM: Message edited by: Celebrían ]

From: First Homely House, Rivendell, Eriador | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Glóin the Dark
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GLÓIN'S GASTRONOMICAL GLORIES

I wanted to call it "Dwarf's Dinner", but the publishers insisted. Anyway, here is how to make yourself one unforgettable meal:

Step 1: Beer. Pour yourself a pint of beer to drink while you prepare the feast. If you've any sort of discernment it will be ale (and not lager) in which case it should be cool, but not so cold that you can barely taste it. Alternatively, you may prefer to follow the example of that chap Keith Floyd, in which case you will be requiring three bottles of red wine before dinner.

Step 2: Find the things. There are these things that you need in order to make your dinner: a plate, a knife, a frying pan, and probably some others I've forgotten. These can normally all be found hidden away in disparate compartments in the kitchen. Remain calm and you should be able to put your hands on most of the essential items near the beginning of the process, which will prevent frustration at a later time (when it might interfere with the flow of your cooking).

Step 3: Prepare the lettuce. Some people are of the opinion that eating lettuce is as absurd as eating paper, but it is an essential ingredient in this recipe, and this is what you do with it. Firstly, find the lettuce. According to Delia Smith, you shouldn't wash it. (This may not be to some people's tastes since, depending on the time of year, there may be a few thousand dead insects on the lettuce.) Now remove some of the leaves - how many depends on the size of the leaves and the size of your appetite. Once you have removed these leaves, try to place them in a neat and pretty arrangement on your plate. It won't work out, but at least you can say you tried.

Step 4: Slice the tomato. You'll need to make sure your knife is sharp for this part. There's nothing more disheartening and unappetising than having to saw violently at a tomato (before it splats everywhere); but a very sharp knife will show it who's boss. There are two possible ways to cut a tomato and one impossible way. The first involves making parallel incisions through the tomato, as one might slice the Earth according to its lines of latitude if one were large enough. The second is the longitudinal method (for which, unless one is particularly dextrous, it is necessary first to chop the tomato in half). The impossible way is the one pictured above which will never work out in practice.

Step 5: Deal with the scallions. Scallions are those vegetables which are known to the uneducated only as spring onions. Pull away some of the less palatable-looking leaves (can you call them leaves? I mean the green tubes that stick out) from the outside until the thing begins to look edible; try to stop before it's all gone. Throw the remainder on top of the lettuce and tomato. Two or three should suffice.

Step 6: Forget about the other vegetables. You may have had a notion to include some other vegetables in the recipe: mushrooms, peppers, or cucumber, for example. But time's getting on a bit, and you still haven't had a bite to eat, so let's forget about them and get on with the serious business. Pour yourself another pint too.

Step 7: Fry the sirloin steak. Set the steak on the thing you set things on. Batter it with a rolling pin. All the TV cooks say you should do this, although I'm not sure why - to make sure it's dead, I suppose. Put a lot of pepper on it (remembering to look away before you sneeze). Pour some oil in the frying pan (the yellowish kind, mind you, not the black stuff), and turn on the heat underneath it. After a short while has passed, place the steak in the pan. If you are hit by a stray projectile of burning oil, try to keep your composure and not to seek retribution against the pan (it will not care), although you may release your frustration through the occasional verbal insult. After about a minute and a quarter, turn the steak over (don't touch it with your hands) and let it fry for the same amount of time again. Then lift it up with whatever suitable implements you can find and allow the greasy stuff to run off it for as long as you can be bothered. By this time the kitchen will be engulfed in a haze of smoke, and you will find it difficult to locate your plate (so you should make a clear mental note of exactly where it was before you started the frying bit). Once you've got it, drop the steak anywhere on it. Lie down for a minute to recuperate.

Step 8: Pour the wine. The final essential ingredient is a bottle of red wine. To get at the wine, you'll be needing a corkscrew, which I should have mentioned at the beginning, because you'll never find it now while coughing and spluttering through all that smoke. Perhaps you've got one of those fancy gadgets with levers and stuff, but the chances are that it will break when you try to use it. You'll have to resort to a plain old T-shaped corkscrew, which you employ as follows. First of all, twist the corkscrew into the cork, trying not to break the latter up into little bits. Once you've driven it in fully, hold the bottle in one hand and attempt to pull out the cork with all your strength. If anyone else is present, do your best to maintain a nonchalant, unconcerned expression. When your hand begins to hurt, you may wish to wrap a towel or a sleeve around it to dull the pain. Next, place the bottle firmly between your knees and continue striving to remove the cork. Other configurations you may wish to try involve standing up with the bottle clenched between your feet, or kneeling on one leg with the bottle clamped between your arm and your side. But do remember that it's best to abandon this project before your face bursts. When the cork still hasn't come out after ten minutes, ask someone else to do it for you; you must cultivate an ability to look indifferent when they prove able to achieve this with a single effortless tug. Finally, pour some wine into a glass. You'll need one of those great big round glasses that hold about a pint. Fill it half way up and drink the wine back. If it's nice, fill it all the way up; if not, just have another ale.

Enjoy!

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Aerel
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quote:
Scallions are those vegetables which are known to the uneducated only as spring onions.
Forsooth, sirrah, you forgot to specify the type of scallion. Do you mean the common garden variety, or the wild singing variety known as the "rapscallion"?
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